Tom van de Oudeweetering - Fotograaf
TomvandeOudeweetering.com

I bought my first little digital consumer camera in 2005 . I couldn't stop taking pictures. Much like a musician mastering his or her instrument by practicing all the time. Often annoying my surroundings. In 2009 I moved from Antwerp to live in a nature reserve. As a cityperson I was completely grasped by the way the landscape changed following the seasons. Surprised and overwhelmed by everything surrounding me. I saw a great deal of small enchanting details I wanted to capture. This led me, with the help of books and the internet, to train myself taking macro pictures by hand. At first I held my breathe while focussing. I must have looked like a purple toad. Eventually I learned to breathe very calmly from my belly. Now I could use my chest or knee for support. This combined with slow motion ballet like movements so not to deter the insects. Unfortunately I acquired lyme disease by the fall of 2012. My energy swept away and more importantly my uninhibited way of photographing down the drain. In 2010 a few years before the lyme incident my girlfriend and I took a beautiful car trip from the peloponnesos in Greece over land back home. At the small harbor of Dubrovnik my eye was caught by an exuberant painterly scene in the water's reflection. The shots I took there inspired me to dig deeper into this phenomenon. The situations I search for deliver images varying from graphic to lavishly colorful. Technically the requirements are steep. It's hard to obtain an acceptable sharpness across the plain of the image. The means for that are not available on a normal digital camera. Therefore I accumulated a field camera this year. It's a beautiful foldable Japanese gem from the sixties and later a large format lens. By tilting the lens down according to to the Scheimpflug principle now I'm able to achieve sharpness across the plane and all this without having to stop down the iris. The resulting images look very promising. I am still facing some technical issues that need solving. This project continues to be a process in development. With great expectation I'm looking forward to finding new locations under the right circumstances that will deliver more stunning abstract images…